Chile Travel Tips


Chile Travel Tips

  • Consular Travel Visas - As regulations are subject to change at short notice it is advisable to check with the Chilean Consulate for the latest information. At present, for most countries, a visa is not required and at entrance, customs gives up to 90 days.
    • Note: Nationals of the USA , Canada , Mexico and Australia entering Chile for tourist purposes will be charged a processing fee payable on arrival and in cash only.
  • Currency - Peso Chileno. Changing currencies other than US dollars is very difficult. Credit cards and travelers cheques: Access/Mastercard, Diners Club and Visa are all used in Chile with Visa and American Express being the most widely accepted.
    • Dollar bills with rips or tears are generally not accept, or they can be exchanged at a significantly lower rate.
  • Banks - Most bank machines accept Visa, Mastercard and Plus cards. Most ATMs also accept cards with Cirrus and Visa Electron logos.
  • Insurance - It is recommend to take out a policy, which covers medical expenses, emergency evacuation, personal liability, theft and cancellation of the trip.
  • Vaccinations - Regulations and requirements may be subject to change on short notice and it is advisable to contact your doctor well in advance of your date of departure. If you are going to the Andes region, it is wise to check your blood pressure. Recommended vaccinations are: Yellow Fever, Typhoid, DTP and Hepatitis B.
  • Health
    • Water: In general, the city's water supply is safe, although it is always advisable for to drink bottled water. Be careful when leaving the larger cities and entering unpopulated areas though, for your security it is highly recommended to drink bottled water. As in other countries, hygiene or cleanliness of the foods in Chile depends on the place you are consuming foods. In general, serious problems with hygiene do not exist.
    • Raw food - It is generally not advisable to eat uncooked vegetables that grow close to the soil (i.e., lettuce, carrots, strawberries, etc.), unless you get them from an established supermarket chain (Jumbo, Unimarc, Almac, etc.), who monitor the source of their products. Established restaurants will also guarantee this.
    • Altitude sickness - In the Chilean high plains, at the North of the country, and in some border zones, it is possible to become affected by altitude. The lack of oxygen and atmospheric pressure may cause headaches, nausea, shortness of breath, and physical weakness in some people. In two to five days, the body should adapt to the oxygen shortage.
  • Tipping - Tip 10% in restaurants and hotels. Do not tip taxi drivers, though you may leave them change from the fare.
  • Safety - Compared to most Latin American countries, Chile is very safe for traveling. Exceptions, are, as everywhere, the slums and the centers of the big cities. 
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